November 10th, 1864

November 10th, 1864

General Sherman sent word via telegraph to General Corse, who was in command of the garrison at Rome.  Corse, who had distinguished himself in early October at the Battle of Allatoona Pass, was to begin destroying anything in Rome that had or could have military value to the Confederates.  The most important items of military value were the Noble Foundry and the Rail Road.  The Foundry was destroyed with explosive charges and the remainder of the majority of the city was put to the torch.  While many buildings were not designated as being of military value, some were set on fire by over zealous soldiers and others burned because of their proximity to military targets.  By morning there were very few buildings still standing.  The ones that survived were isolated from the main part of town that burned.  The Federals destroyed two train depots and a warehouse as well as a livery stable still containing horses.  As Corse and his men moved south to rendezvous with the remainder of Sherman’s Army, they began to destroy the railroad.

In Atlanta, Sherman’s Chief Engineer, Capt. Orlando Poe, was busy at work destroying anything of military value and was focusing much attention on the railroad and its related facilities.  Poe had built a battering ram with an iron bar that was just over 21 feet long and suspended from a ten foot tall wooden suspension system.  This was used to destroy the round house and depot.  Some buildings were also rigged with explosives to be set off upon their departure.  In five days, as the Federals leave Atlanta, it will be nothing more that a smoldering ruin.

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Downtown Rome, Georgia.  Noble Foundry, which produced arms, including cannons, once stood on the site of what is now Southeaster Mills.  Here at First St. and Broad St.  In this image the Broad Street bridge crosses the Etowah River and the factory to the right is former location of Noble Foundry.  Taken from the top of the hill at Myrtle Hill Cemetery near the Confederate Monument.
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The First Presbyterian Church of Rome is one of the few remaining period structures from the Civil War in Rome.  It was used by the Federal occupation forces as a warehouse for food and supplies.  Federal troops also poured molasses down the organ pipes and removed the pews to build horse stalls.
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Remains of some earthworks at Fort Norton, which sits upon Civic Center Hill in Rome and is part of a city park with walking trails.  This fort was one of three forts used to protect Rome and manufacturing facilities from the Federals. 
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Remnants of earthworks at Fort Norton, Rome Ga.
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The railroad the lead from Rome through Kingston to Cartersville.  General Corse used this railroad to reinforce Allatoona Pass in October of 1864.  As the order was given to abandon Rome, the Federals destroyed most of the city and as they marched east to link up with other Federal forces to move towards Atlanta, they destroyed as much of the railroad as possible.

 

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150 Years Ago Today: November 10th, 1864

November 10th, 1864
     General Sherman sent word via telegraph to General Corse, who was in command of the garrison at Rome.  Corse, who had distinguished himself in early October at the Battle of Allatoona Pass, was to begin destroying anything in Rome that had or could have military value to the Confederates.  The most important items of military value were the Noble Foundry and the Rail Road.  The Foundry was destroyed with explosive charges and the remainder of the majority of the city was put to the torch.  While many buildings were not designated as being of military value, some were set on fire by over zealous soldiers and others burned because of their proximity to military targets.  By morning there were very few buildings still standing.  The ones that survived were isolated from the main part of town that burned.  The Federals destroyed two train depots and a warehouse as well as a livery stable still containing horses.  As Corse and his men moved south to rendezvous with the remainder of Sherman’s Army, they began to destroy the railroad.
     In Atlanta, Sherman’s Chief Engineer, Capt. Orlando Poe, was busy at work destroying anything of military value and was focusing much attention on the railroad and its related facilities.  Poe had built a battering ram with an iron bar that was just over 21 feet long and suspended from a ten foot tall wooden suspension system.  This was used to destroy the round house and depot.  Some buildings were also rigged with explosives to be set off upon their departure.  In five days, as the Federals leave Atlanta, it will be nothing more that a smoldering ruin.