150 Years Ago Today: August 6th, 1864 The Battle of Utoy Creek

August 6th, 1864:  The Battle of Utoy Creek
     This morning, Sherman has accepted the resignation of Palmer, who will be on a train back to Chattanooga by the afternoon, and  the Federals had formed up their lines and everyone was in place to attempt an advance across Utoy Creek towards the railroad in East Point.  With Palmer’s resignation, Robert W. Johnson, a division commander within the XIV Corps, was appointed Commander of the XIV Corps and placed under the command of Schofield.  Displeased with the performance of the XIV Corps on the previous day, Schofield had moved his XXIII Corps to the right of the XIV Corps.  The XXIII Corps is now the Federal right flank and the XIV Corps is the left flank with Logan’s XV Corps in support to their left.  Palmer’s Corp was fanned out in an arch following the current Beecher Road south to Benjamin E. Mays and making a slight turn to the west, just north of Cascade Road.  Palmer’s right ended near Willis Mill Road.  Schofield’s left was adjacent to Palmer’s right with Cox’s Division along Cascade Road and stretching out west.  Hascall’s Division of Schofield’s Corps turn south making a 90 degree turn to the south and was facing the end of the Confederate line at the Confederate left flank. 
     The battle began when Cox’s Division moved south and Hascall’s Division moved east to press the Confederate flank.  The 11th Kentucky Regiment (Federal) of Cox’s Division was at the front of the advancing line and made first contact with the 4th Kentucky (CSA), who were posted as skirmishers in front the famed Kentucky Orphan Brigade.  This action happened in the area of the waterfall in what is now Cascade Springs Nature Preserve.  Cox’s attack was repulsed and a severe loss.  He reformed for another attempt, but was repulsed a second time after which he withdrew from the assault.  Hascall was hindered by the South Fork of Utoy Creek and made minimal gains in his assault.  He did reach the rear of an artillery battery, which withdrew to the east to another position on high ground from which they still had a commanding view. 
     Palmer’s Corps, now commanded by Johnson, has sat idle most of the day and did not make an attempt to attack until late afternoon and he only attacked with one division.  He gained no headway and retired before anything larger than a skirmish developed. 
     The Confederate left flank was manned by Bate’s Division along a ridge line just south of Sandtown Road (Cascade Road).  S. D. Lee’s Division connected to Bate’s right at the Sandtown Road east of what is now Beecher road.  Bate’s left flank was open and vulnerable to attack and on the night of the 6th, Hood ordered Bate’s Division to withdraw from the area back to the Confederate main defensive line. 

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Author: Clint Brownlee

My name is Clint Brownlee and I am a Photographer in Woodstock, Georgia with over 20 years of photographic experience in many different aspects of photography. I have photographed everything from weddings, special events and portraits to published materials, but my passion has always been Fine Art and Nature Photography. I have had a several shows at the Mason Murer Fine Art Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia and The Roswell Visual Arts Center in Roswell, Georgia. I now sell through my website: www.clintbrownleephotography.com

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