The Battle of Utoy Creek

August 5th, 1864:

The conflict between General’s Sherman, Palmer and Schofield continued throughout the day.  Palmer sent multiple letters arguing back and forth with Sherman.  Palmer’s final letter said “I will call upon you tomorrow morning and present a formal application to be relieved.”  While they bickered back and forth, Federal units were still trying to get in line for the move toward East Point.  For the remainder of the day Palmer agrees to relay orders from Schofield to his XIV Corps.  Baird’s Division advances south toward Utoy Creek and encounter the Confederate skirmishers.  They take about 140 prisoners.  They then turn towards the east and encounter an artillery barrage.  They decide not to advance and assault the Confederate works as they assume they will be repulsed.  Davis brings his division up along side Baird’s and comes to halt as well.  Schofield is not happy about the assault coming to a halt.  He orders Johnson’s Division of Palmer’s Corps to swing around the right and attack the Confederate left flank.  Johnson waits until early evening to begin his movement, which he calls a “reconnaissance”.  He moved a short distance and then calls it off since it is too late in the day to do much good.  He falls back to the rear of Davis.  Schofield and Sherman are both displeased with the performance of Palmer’s XIV Corps.  Palmer will resign in the morning and for a time Johnson will command the XIV Corps.

During the night of the 5th, Hood orders the defensive lines extended further south and west to protect the railroad in East Point.  The line extended about 1.25 miles from the existing defensive lines, down a ridge line the paralleled the Sandtown Road (Cascade Road), and overlooked the North Fork of Utoy Creek.  The far left of the line ended in the area of the current Cascade Springs Nature Preserve.

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Looking north along the bike path in Lionel Hampton – Beecher Hills Park.  Cox’s Division of Schofield’s 23rd Corps (US) established their lines on the ridge line at the top of the hill in the distance.
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Portion of Federal earthworks manned by Cox’s Division.
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A fairly long stretch of earthworks occupied by Cox’s Division of Schofield’s 23rd Corps (US) inside Lionel Hampton – Beecher Hills Park.
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A dead tree lies across the remnants of Federal earthworks of Cox’s Division.  The log helps demonstrate the depth of the remaining earthworks that are tucked away in the forest of Lionel Hampton – Beecher Hills Park.
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Author: Clint Brownlee

My name is Clint Brownlee and I am a Photographer in Woodstock, Georgia with over 20 years of photographic experience in many different aspects of photography. I have photographed everything from weddings, special events and portraits to published materials, but my passion has always been Fine Art and Nature Photography. I have had a several shows at the Mason Murer Fine Art Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia and The Roswell Visual Arts Center in Roswell, Georgia. I now sell through my website: www.clintbrownleephotography.com

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