December 12th, 1864

Dec. 12th, Kilpatrick is dispatched with his cavalry to locate an assault route to Fort McAllister.  Fort McAllister protects the mouth of the Ogeechee River and must be taken in order for Sherman to begin supplying his army.  After locating a route and informing Sherman, Kilpatrick rides to Midway and makes his headquarters at the Midway Church and then sends forces to Sunbury in an attempt to contact the Federal Fleet.

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Looking west across the Ogeechee River from Fort McAllister.  Sherman need to capture this fort in order to open the river for the Union Navy to bring in supplies.  Kilpatrick’s Cavalry found a route to the fort by land, which they reported to General Sherman.  Kilpatrick then moved southwest to Midway.
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Midway Church, constructed in 1792 as a replacement for a previous meeting house that was burned in 1779.  Kilpatrick’s Cavalry camped here at the church and Kilpatrick used it as a headquarters while he operated in the area.
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Across the road on the far side of the church is a walled cemetery where many notable people from Georgia’s history are buried.  After raiding and looting the surrounding plantations, the Federal Cavalry soldiers used the cemetery as a coral for the livestock they liberated from near by citizens. 
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The Ebenezer Creek Incident, December 8th – 10th, 1864

Dec. 8th – Dec. 10th, the Left Wing marches toward Savannah passing through Springfield and Ebenezer.  All the while meeting more resistance.  The Right Wing begins to push elements to the East through Pooler and also faces increased resistance.

The Ebenezer Creek Incident:  On the 9th of December 1864, the Federal 14th Corps was being hounded by Confederate Cavalry.  When they reached the creek they found the bridge had been burned and the engineers were brought up to build pontoon bridges.  The 14th Corps had been followed along their march through Georgia by a growing number of freed slaves, some historians estimate that there were nearly 5,000 former slaves following the 14th Corps. The Federals had asked the freed slaves not to follow the army as they did not have the resources to support their growing numbers.  In a tactical decision, Brig. Gen. Jefferson Davis(not the Confederate President of the same name), ordered the pontoon bridge to be taken up before the refugees crossed.  He was being pressed by the Confederate Cavalry and in order to save his troops, he stranded the refugees across the rain swollen Ebenezer Creek.  As the Confederates closed in, many of the former slaves were in a panic and attempted to swim across the creek.  Few made it across and hundreds died trying to cross the swift moving water.  Many were recaptured by the Confederates as they reached the creek.  Upon reaching Savannah later in December, there was an official investigation of the incident and General Davis was not reprimanded or punished in anyway.  Some historians speculate that the move was planned as a way to rid the 14th Corps of the refugees as they were slowing their advance.  General Sherman supported Generals Davis’s decision as the right thing to do from a military standpoint.  (I was unable to photograph the location as the land was in the process of changing hands and is now set aside to become a public park sometime in the future.)

Dec. 10th, General Sherman arrives on the outskirts of Savannah’s defenses and begins to plan for siege operations.  Sherman begins to lay siege to the defenses of Savannah and artillery exchanges become a frequent occurrence.  In order to keep up a siege, Sherman know he will need supplies and must make contact with the Federal Navy just off the coast.

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Jerusalem Evangelical Lutheran Church is located in New Ebenezer and was built in 1767.  It is the oldest Lutheran congregation in the country as well as the oldest church still standing in the state of Georgia.  The 14th Corps camped here for several days.  There is a good museum with some period structures and the oldest orphanage in the state located adjacent to the church property.
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The interior of Jerusalem Church.  The Federals ransacked the church and burned down the parsonage as well.  In 1915 the U.S. Government reimbursed the church the $225.00 for damages done by the 14th Corps.
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The cemetery at New Ebenezer was once surrounded by wooden fence that was destroyed by the Federal troops for a variety of uses. 
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Zion Church, located at the intersection of Ga. 17 and Ga. 30, was used as a headquarters on December 8th by General Sherman. 

December 6th and 7th, 1864

Dec. 6th and 7th, the Right Wing marched through Bulloch County and crossed the Ogeechee River at Jenks Bridge, where US 80 crosses the Ogeechee River, and at the canal bridge, the remnants of which are visible today at the Savannah Ogeechee Canal Society park.

 

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The Savannah Ogeechee Canal as it opens to the Ogeechee River.  The bricks in the foreground are part of the final lock of the canal. 
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All that remains of this bridge over the Ogeechee river are the pilings.  It is located just below, down stream, of the canal.  The Confederates burned the bridge prior to the arrival of elements of the Federal 15th Corps.  Two Divisions of the 15th were on the far side of the river and skirmished with Confederates as they crossed river north and south of the canal. 

December 5th, 1864

Dec. 5th, 1864:

General Hardee is now well aware of the Sherman’s intent to move on Savannah and has placed his command between Sherman and Savannah.  The Right and Left Wings are both moving in a south easterly direction using the main roads into Savannah.  On the 5th, Sherman, traveling with the 17th Corps reaches the Ogeechee Church in what is now Oliver.  He took possession of a private home for his headquarters and remained here for several days to coordinate the movements of his command.  They were now within 50 miles of Savannah.

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Here at Ogeechee Church, a small force of Confederate soldiers about 4,000 strong, established a line here in an attempt to hold the Federal advance in check.  After skirmishing with Sherman’s 17th Corps on the 4th, the Confederates were forced to withdraw during the night as they learned Federal forces were crossing the river on their and right in an attempt to surround them.  On the 5th, Sherman moved into the area and established a headquarters at a private residence.  This church was used as a battlefield landmark and was used by Federal forces as well.
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The Railroad to Savannah, looking south along the straight and flat tracks from Oliver towards Savannah.  The Federals continued to destroy as much of the railroad as possible during their march towards Savannah.

The Battle of Waynesboro

Dec. 4th, 1864:     The Battle of Waynesboro

On the morning of the 4th, Kilpatrick’s Cavalry supported by two Brigades of Infantry marched on Waynesboro.  Their objective was to capture the town and burn all the bridges over Brier Creek.  As they approached the town they encountered General Wheeler’s skirmishers and drove them in toward the main line of works.  Being out numbered by the Federals who were advancing rapidly on their position and were about to over run them, the Confederates fell back to another line of prepared work in the streets of Waynesboro.  As Wheeler was again about to be overrun by a larger force, he ordered his Texans and Tennesseans to charge, thus delaying the Federals long enough for Wheeler to move his forces to block the Augusta road should Kilpatrick turn that way.  After quickly taking control of the town, the Federals burned the bridges over Brier Creek and set fire to the town.  The towns people were able to suppress many of the fires saving a great deal of the town.

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The court house in downtown Waynesboro.

December 3rd, 1864

Dec. 3rd, 1864:

The Left Wing passes through the area of Buckhead Church where on the 28th the Federal Cavalry under Kilpatrick clashed with Wheeler’s Confederate Cavalry.  The Left Wing then marches into Millen.  Parts of the Right wing have started moving out of Millen and are moving past Scarboro.

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Cavalry units of both sides fought for control of this creek and the bridge that crossed it.  The Confederates were not able to stop the Federal advance and soon retreated.  They burned the original bridge to slow the Federal advance.
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Buckhead Creek
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Buckhead Church.  The congregation was formed in 1774, this structure was built in 1855.  Federal troops camped at this site.
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After Confederate Cavalry destroyed the original bridge at Buckhead Creek, the Federals used pews and other materials from the church to construct a new bridge across the Buckhead Creek.

December 2nd, 1864

Dec. 2nd, 1864:

Sherman and the Right Wing move into Millen.  Sherman stays here for a day so that he can communicate with all parts of his army.  Soldiers give reports of the deplorable conditions found at the abandoned Camp Lawton just north of town.  Nearly the entire town is burned to the ground over the next day or so.

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At one time this field was enclosed by a stockade and house overflow POW’s from Andersonville.  Now the site is Magnolia Springs State Park.  The POW’s had all been moved prior to the arrival of the Federal troops, but the Federals were able to witness the deplorable conditions first hand.
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Archeologist and their students from Georgia Southern University have been conducting digs onsite in an effort to better understand the conditions of the prison camp.
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Earthworks of the Fort that guarded the stockade at Camp Lawton are still visible with a hiking trail that leads area.
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These railroad tracks located less than a mile east of the stockade, carried prisoners to and from the stockade.  They would disembark the train here and march to camp down a dusty dirt road.  These tracks move north towards Augusta and south to Savannah.
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POW’s passed across these railroad tracks in Milen on their way to Camp Lawton just north of town.  Sherman’s forces destroyed much of the railroad in the area.
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Not much of Milen from before the Civil War exist today, as the Federals, angered by the nearby prison camp, burned the town to the ground.