December 5th, 1864

Dec. 5th, 1864:

General Hardee is now well aware of the Sherman’s intent to move on Savannah and has placed his command between Sherman and Savannah.  The Right and Left Wings are both moving in a south easterly direction using the main roads into Savannah.  On the 5th, Sherman, traveling with the 17th Corps reaches the Ogeechee Church in what is now Oliver.  He took possession of a private home for his headquarters and remained here for several days to coordinate the movements of his command.  They were now within 50 miles of Savannah.

_dsc0419-bw
Here at Ogeechee Church, a small force of Confederate soldiers about 4,000 strong, established a line here in an attempt to hold the Federal advance in check.  After skirmishing with Sherman’s 17th Corps on the 4th, the Confederates were forced to withdraw during the night as they learned Federal forces were crossing the river on their and right in an attempt to surround them.  On the 5th, Sherman moved into the area and established a headquarters at a private residence.  This church was used as a battlefield landmark and was used by Federal forces as well.
_dsc0433-bw
The Railroad to Savannah, looking south along the straight and flat tracks from Oliver towards Savannah.  The Federals continued to destroy as much of the railroad as possible during their march towards Savannah.
Advertisements

December 1st, 1864

Dec. 1st, 1864:

The Right Wing, who Sherman is now traveling with, is making its way towards Millen and passes through the area of Herndon and Birdsville, west of Millen.

_dsc0338-bw
Birdsville Plantation, still a private residence and owned by the same family since the land was granted by the King in the 1700’s, was visited by elements of the Right Wing of Sherman’s Army.  Bummers, ransacked the house and in an attempt to find valuables, they dug up fresh graves in the family plot, all they found were the bodies of twin children that had recently died.  This home was built around 1789 and local legend holds that the home is haunted with apparitions, the sound of footsteps, voices, children crying and doors that open and close by their selves.
_dsc0327-bw
A small community sprung up around the plantation and at one time this served as the school.
_dsc0354-bw
A classic southern oak lined road leading to Birdsville Plantation.

July 3rd, 1864

July 3rd, 1864:

General Sherman entered Marietta and established his headquarters in the Kennesaw House and ordered his forces to continue the pursuit of the Confederates and attempt to engage them no matter what the cost of men and material.  They must press their advantage while the Confederates are retreating.

The Kennesaw House saw many uses during the war.  Early in the war, Andrews and a few of conspirators, stayed here the night before they stole a train attempted to destroy the railroad that was supplying the Confederate Army.  It was also used as a hospital at one point as well as a Sherman’s Headquarters.  Now it is a museum well worth the visit.

_DSC0097.bw

The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain

June 27th, 1864

The battle of Kennesaw Mountain was really an extended operation that lasted for several days before and after the 27th.  Troops were under small arms and cannon fire daily, the 27th was day of the main Federal Assault at Cheatham’s Hill, also known as the Dead Angle, as well as the area of Pigeon Hill and the remainder of the Federal left.  After days of a stalemate, General Sherman was frustrated and ordered a frontal assault on the Confederate Lines.  The attack was to begin at 8:00am on the 27th, but was delayed for nearly an hour.  Their goal was to break the Confederate line at what they thought was the weakest point.  They chose Cheatham’s Hill due the salient in the line.  General Sherman ordered General McPherson to use his Army of the Tennessee to attack the right of the Confederate line as a diversion to the main assault.  McPherson’s diversionary attack was carried out against Big Kennesaw, Little Kennesaw, and Pigeon Hill.  General Schofield, who was still positioned astride the Powder Springs Road near Kolb’s Farm, was ordered to keep extending the Federal right flank in an attempt to reach the end of the Confederate lines and turn their flank.  General Thomas and his Army of the Cumberland were positioned in the center of the Federal lines.

The main Federal assault was carried out by elements of Palmer’s XIV Corps and Howard’s IV Corps.  They were attacking the salient angle that was manned by Cheatham and Cleburne of Hardee’s Corps.  The Confederates were outnumbered, but were behind a strong line of works.  The Federal troops took a beating and at one point on the hill, there was a dead spot.  The Southern soldiers could not fire upon this spot due to the position of their works and the angle of the hill.  The Union troops in this spot began to dig in with their bayonets, tin cups and dinner plates.  They were only about 25 to 30 yards from their objective.  During the night, shovels and picks were brought up to facilitate easier digging and an attempt to tunnel into the hill and under the Confederate works was made.  The plan was to pack it with powder and blow up the works, but the tunnel was abandoned after only making it about half way to the Confederate line.

Federal losses were just over 3,000 and the Confederate losses were about 1000.  This was a tactical defeat for the Federal Army, but Schofield eventually made it to the end of the Confederate line and began moving to flank General Johnston.  This forced Johnston to withdraw from his lines at Kennesaw Mountain and towards the Chattahoochee.  There are many stories of Gallantry, Bravery, and Humanitarian acts during the battle.  The stories and accounts from the diaries of the men who fought and died here make for excellent reading and paint an vivid picture of what happened here.

With this battlefield being pretty well preserved I have a significant number of images to share.  This post will contain images from the area of Cheatham’s Hill and tomorrow I will post a few images from Pigeon Hill.

_DSC0038.bw
 Located close to the Confederate lines at Cheatham’s hill are multiple markers for the fallen.
_DSC0044.bw
The Illinois monument placed here by veterans of the battle to honor their fallen comrades. 
_DSC0065.bw
The Left section of Turner’s Battery located along the lines of Cheatham’s Hill.
_DSC0476.bw
Numerous earthworks are located at Cheatham’s Hill, this section is between the parking lot and the Illinois monument. 
_DSC0481.bw
There were many accounts of soldiers being wounded and were left untreated on the field for several days during the battle until a truce was reached so that each side could tend the wounded and bury the dead.  This soldier laid here wounded for two day before he passed.
_DSC0539.bw
Confederate works along Cheatham’s Hill
_DSC0544.bw
Many Federal officers bravely led charges against the Confederate entrenchments, only to fall short mere feet from their goal.
_DSC0280.bw
 Coming from the approach of the Federals as they moved towards the salient in Cheatham’s line called the “Dead Angle” you will see the shallow remnants of hastily dug Federal works.  Morgan was a rear element behind McCook and Mitchell.
_DSC0306.bw
Just past Morgan’s position we find the starting point McCook’s assault on the Dead Angle.
_DSC0327.bw
Federal works of either Kimball’s or Hazen’s Brigade.  They were positioned next to each other with Hazen on the left and Kimball on the right as they attacked the Confederate line a few hundred yards north of the Dead Angle.  They would have been attacking Confederate brigades commanded by Govan, Polk and Granbury.
_DSC0386.bw
McCook, along with Mitchell on his right and Harker on his left attacked straight up to the Dead Angle, now home of the Illinois Monument.  Many a man died on this field.
_DSC0261
June 27th, 2014:  150 years after the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, a luminary for each lost soul was place on the field of battle before the Illinois Monument to honor sacrifice for their country.
_DSC0215
June 27th, 2014:  Reenactors in a Federal impression move among the luminaries like ghost of the men that died on this very ground.  After speaking with their unit, I was introduced to a direct descendant of soldier under McCook’s command that died on this very field 150 years ago

 

Photography Day 22 is done!

I spent the day doing a very detailed study of the Chattahoochee River Line and the Shoupades.  I was able to visit 5 of the Shoupades that are left as well as a seven gun battery.  After covering the River Line I moved a little to the North West and made images of the Smyrna Line and the areas around the Battle of Smyrna and the Battle of Ruff’s Mill, including the Concord Covered Bridge.  Part of the original mill is still standing as well.  It was a grist mill and was spared by the Federal troops.  The covered bridge was built after the war to replace the one that was burned by the Federals on the July 4th, 1864.  From there I went to the Lovette School and made some images of the Earthworks there and also made some images of the “trading rock” in the river at Pace’s Ferry.  On the way home I stopped in Vinings and photographed the Pace house and the railroad tracks.  I will be back in that same general area tomorrow to photograph some other locations.  A good day, even though it was hot and humid.  I had about 29 gigs of data which works out to about 1800 images.  I have so much editing to do.  I even had someone come up and speak to me, sort  of, I was fairly deep in the woods and I was the only living soul around, but I did hear a voice right behind me and I turned to answer them and saw no one there.  Creeped me out a little.  I have a digital voice recorder that I attach to my tripod for taking notes, it’s faster than pulling out pen and paper, I will have to go back and listen to it see if I can here the voice on there.

My personal paranormal experience at New Hope Church

Here is a link to a post I wrote for Paranormal Georgia Investigations blog.  It is about a personal experience I had while scouting the New Hope Church Battlefield for my book.

http://paranormalgeorgia.wordpress.com/2014/03/01/war-was-here/